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China's Quest for Energy Security

China's Quest for Energy Security

Author: Erica Strecker Downs

Publisher: Rand Corporation

ISBN: 9780833048325

Category: Political Science

Page: 82

View: 524

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China's two decades of rapid economic growth have fueled a demand for energy that has outstripped domestic sources of supply. China became a net oil importer in 1993, and the country's dependence on energy imports is expected to continue to grow over the next 20 years, when it is likely to import some 60 percent of its oil and at least 30 percent of its natural gas. China thus is having to abandon its traditional goal of energyself-sufficiency--brought about by a fear of strategic vulnerability--and look abroad for resources. This study looks at the measures that China is taking to achieve energy security and the motivations behind those measures. It considers China's investment in overseas oil exploration and development projects, interest in transnational oil pipelines, plans for a strategic petroleum reserve, expansion of refineries to process crude supplies from the Middle East, development of the natural gas industry, and gradual opening of onshore drilling areas to foreign oil companies. The author concludes that these activities are designed, in part, to reduce the vulnerability of China's energy supply to U.S. power. China's international oil and gas investments, however, are unlikely to bring China theenergy security it desires. China is likely to remain reliant on U.S. protection of the sea-lanes that bring the country most of its energy imports.

China’s Search for Energy Security

China’s Search for Energy Security

Author: Suisheng Zhao

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317981206

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 740

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China’s rapid economic growth in the recent decades has produced an unprecedented energy vulnerability that could threaten the sustainability of its economic development, a linchpin to social stability and ultimately the regime legitimacy of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) as well as the foundation for China's rising power aspirations. What is the Chinese perception of the energy security and challenges, how has the Chinese government responded to the challenges? What are the international implications of China’s search for energy security? This collection of contributions by leading scholars seeks answers to these extremely important questions. The book is divided into three parts. Part I presents an overview of China’s sense of energy security and its strategic responses. Part II examines China’s energy policy-making processes, the efforts to reform and reorganize the energy sector and reset policy priorities Part III focuses on the international implications of China’s search for energy security. This book consists of articles published in the Journal of Contemporary China.

China’s Search for Energy Security

China’s Search for Energy Security

Author: Suisheng Zhao

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317981190

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 611

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China’s rapid economic growth in the recent decades has produced an unprecedented energy vulnerability that could threaten the sustainability of its economic development, a linchpin to social stability and ultimately the regime legitimacy of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) as well as the foundation for China's rising power aspirations. What is the Chinese perception of the energy security and challenges, how has the Chinese government responded to the challenges? What are the international implications of China’s search for energy security? This collection of contributions by leading scholars seeks answers to these extremely important questions. The book is divided into three parts. Part I presents an overview of China’s sense of energy security and its strategic responses. Part II examines China’s energy policy-making processes, the efforts to reform and reorganize the energy sector and reset policy priorities Part III focuses on the international implications of China’s search for energy security. This book consists of articles published in the Journal of Contemporary China.

China’s Energy Security and Relations With Petrostates

China’s Energy Security and Relations With Petrostates

Author: Anna Kuteleva

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000406320

Category: Political Science

Page: 164

View: 603

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This book examines the development of bilateral energy relations between China and the two oil-rich countries, Kazakhstan and Russia. Challenging conventional assumptions about energy politics and China’s global quest for oil, this book examines the interplay of politics and sociocultural contexts. It shows how energy resources become ideas and how these ideas are mobilized in the realm of international relations. China’s relations with Kazakhstan and Russia are simultaneously enabled and constrained by the discursive politics of oil. It is argued that to build collaborative and constructive energy relations with China, its partners in Kazakhstan, Russia, and elsewhere must consider not only the material realities of China’s energy industry and the institutional settings of China’s energy policy but also the multiple symbolic meanings that energy resources and, particularly, oil acquire in China. China’s Energy Security and Relations with Petrostates offers a nuanced understanding of China’s bilateral energy relations with Kazakhstan and Russia, raising essential questions about the social logic of international energy politics. It will appeal to students and scholars of international relations, energy security, Chinese and post-Soviet studies, along with researchers working in the fields of energy policy and environmental sustainability.

China's International Quest for Oil Security

China's International Quest for Oil Security

Author: Jeremy Martin Kimball

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:913126440

Category:

Page: 156

View: 403

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China's flourishing economy depends upon access to and greater use of energy resources, especially oil. Consequently, energy security has become of paramount importance to the Chinese government. China, however, perceives a reliance on international oil markets as dangerous and also considers itself vulnerable to the United States, which could conceivably restrict oil imports to China in a time of conflict. In order to enhance China's energy security, Chinese oil companies have sought to obtain oil resources throughout the world, and Beijing has cultivated closer relations with various oil-producing nations. China's heightened demand for oil and its efforts to secure access to oil resources are worrisome to the United States. Fears largely stem from the idea that increased consumption by both the United States and China will inevitably lead to fiercer competition between the two nations and result in a zero-sum game in which a gain for one country comes at the expense of the other country. Anxiety in the United States also is based upon the notion that, as China exerts greater influence around the world through its economic expansion and as it establishes closer bonds with oil-producing nations, China will undermine American interests and foreign policy objectives. Not all concerns regarding China are inflated, but many of them are. Indeed, China's rise will pose certain challenges to American influence and supremacy in some regions, and China's relationships with states that the United States would like to isolate are troublesome. It is important, however, for the United States to be selective in its criticisms of China. Unsubstantiated apprehension will lead to counter-productive policies with respect to China, which, in turn, will alienate China and render other attempts to support American interests fruitless. China's acquisitions of oil resources do not inherently contravene American energy security interests. Thus, the United States should not fret about China's pursuit of oil. The United States should continually reaffirm its professed faith in free markets, including their ability to provide energy security, and in that way allay Chinese concerns about its own vulnerability. If the United States can set aside its uneasiness about China's quest for oil, it can more effectively address Chinese actions that directly and negatively affect American interests and also recognize that opportunities for mutual gain and cooperation abound.

Africa and Energy Security

Africa and Energy Security

Author: Ruchita Beri

Publisher: Academic Foundation

ISBN: 8171887546

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 268

View: 759

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Transcript of papers presented during an international conference in New Delhi in June 2008 hosted jointly by the Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses and International Peace Research Institute, Oslo.

China's Quest for Great Power

China's Quest for Great Power

Author: Bernard Cole

Publisher: Naval Institute Press

ISBN: 9781682471456

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 538

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This book addresses three important facets of China’s modern development. First is the ongoing modernization of the People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN). The Chinese navy has grown from a relatively small, backward force in the 1980s into a capable twenty-first century maritime power. The PLAN now deploys around the world and includes nuclear-powered submarines, the first of several aircraft carriers, modern guided missile destroyers and frigates, and the world’s most formidable force of seagoing cruise and ballistic missiles. This modern, growing navy is intended in significant part to undergird China’s global search for energy sources and security. Beijing’s determination to maintain its historic economic growth depends on energy security. These two national priorities—a navy capable of defending China’s national security and economic interests and secury energy resources—come together to define and support Chinese foreign policy. This book addresses these three in both global and Asian contextual terms, with special emphasis on relations between China and the United States.

Asian Energy Security

Asian Energy Security

Author: H. Lai

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230619609

Category: Political Science

Page: 236

View: 120

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The main focus of the contributors of this volume is to analyze closely major aspects of energy security, energy diplomacy, and maritime security in East and Southeast Asia. Specifically, they examine the current state of energy security and maritime security of China and Japan, as well as Southeast Asia.

Energy Security in Asia

Energy Security in Asia

Author: Michael Wesley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134129683

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 256

View: 542

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This book explores the various dimensions of energy security in Asia – which has become an increasingly important geopolitical issue. Reputable international contributors look at the roles played by each of the major energy importers: the United States, China, Japan and India, as well as the main suppliers: the OPEC states, Russia, the Central Asian states and Australia. In each case, the domestic politics of energy security are investigated, and state interests and perspectives on the issue are considered. Analyzing the policy and security aspects of energy security, the book includes an examination of: the geopolitics of energy competition strategic, economic and environmental dimensions the impacts of energy security on human security. With energy security being one of the central issues facing the world today, this book is a timely and impressive appraisal of the major energy security issues facing Asia.

Energy Security and Global Politics

Energy Security and Global Politics

Author: Daniel Moran

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134002009

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 272

View: 743

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This book analyses the strategic dimensions of energy security, particularly where energy resources have become the object of military competition. The volume explores the risks that may arise from conditions of increasing economic competition and resource scarcity, and the problems that may follow if major producers or consumers of energy lose confidence in the equity and efficiency of the market, and resort instead to the use of force to secure access to energy. It surveys the strategic outlook of both producer and consumer states, with emphasis on nations or regions (Central Asia, Russia, China, Venezuela, the Persian Gulf) where unstable or rapidly evolving political conditions may undermine the currently prevailing market consensus. It also examines the role of the United States as the chief guarantor of the global economy, and the challenge this poses for its exercise of military power. The book contests that while the global energy market may be largely self-regulating, it is not self-defending. A failure to consider how it can be most effectively defended from emerging and potential challenges merely heightens the risk that those challenges may someday become real.