Something of The Book

PDF EPUB Library of e-Books

Disease and Death in Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture

Disease and Death in Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture

Author: Allan Ingram

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137597182

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 290

View: 425

Download BOOK »
This collection examines different aspects of attitudes towards disease and death in writing of the long eighteenth century. Taking three conditions as examples – ennui, sexual diseases and infectious diseases – as well as death itself, contributors explore the ways in which writing of the period placed them within a borderland between fashionability and unfashionability, relating them to current social fashions and trends. These essays also look at ways in which diseases were fashioned into bearing cultural, moral, religious and even political meaning. Works of literature are used as evidence, but also medical writings, personal correspondence and diaries. Diseases or conditions subject to scrutiny include syphilis, male impotence, plague, smallpox and consumption. Death, finally, is looked at both in terms of writers constructing meanings within death and of the fashioning of posthumous reputation.

Death and the Body in the Eighteenth-Century Novel

Death and the Body in the Eighteenth-Century Novel

Author: Jolene Zigarovich

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9781512823783

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 281

View: 434

Download BOOK »
Death and the Body in the Eighteenth-Century Novel demonstrates that archives continually speak to the period's rising funeral and mourning culture, as well as the increasing commodification of death and mourning typically associated with nineteenth-century practices. Drawing on a variety of historical discourses--such as wills, undertaking histories, medical treatises and textbooks, anatomical studies, philosophical treatises, and religious tracts and sermons--the book contributes to a fuller understanding of the history of death in the Enlightenment and its narrative transformation. Death and the Body in the Eighteenth-Century Novel not only offers new insights about the effect of a growing secularization and commodification of death on the culture and its productions, but also fills critical gaps in the history of death, using narrative as a distinct literary marker. As anatomists dissected, undertakers preserved, jewelers encased, and artists figured the corpse, so too the novelist portrayed bodily artifacts. Why are these morbid forms of materiality entombed in the novel? Jolene Zigarovich addresses this complex question by claiming that the body itself--its parts, or its preserved representation--functioned as secular memento, suggesting that preserved remains became symbols of individuality and subjectivity. To support the conception that in this period notions of self and knowing center upon theories of the tactile and material, the chapters are organized around sensory conceptions and bodily materials such as touch, preserved flesh, bowel, heart, wax, hair, and bone. Including numerous visual examples, the book also argues that the relic represents the slippage between corpse and treasure, sentimentality and materialism, and corporeal fetish and aesthetic accessory. Zigarovich's analysis compels us to reassess the eighteenth-century response to and representation of the dead and dead-like body, and its material purpose and use in fiction. In a broader framework, Death and the Body in the Eighteenth-Century Novel also narrates a history of the novel that speaks to the cultural formation of modern individualism.

Malady and Mortality

Malady and Mortality

Author: Helen Thomas

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443896559

Category: Social Science

Page: 351

View: 386

Download BOOK »
This ground-breaking study examines visual and literary responses to, and representations of, illness, dying and death from the perspective of the chronically ill, their families and carers, medics, artists, photographers, authors, and academics. It encourages a re-examination of cultural taboos and visual and literary practices that engage with illness and death. Focusing upon a wide range of creative and critical engagements, this book makes a significant contribution to the medical humanities via its exploration of medical practice, literature and film, digital media studies, graphic design, and both contemporary and historical attitudes towards illness, death (including infant mortality), mourning and bereavement. For some, the experience of illness provokes feelings of exile, crisis or social critique, whilst for others it instigates utopian discourses predicated upon personal reflection, communication or connectivity, wherein the “self” is redefined beyond the parameters and constraints of the “body”.

Literature and Medicine: Volume 1

Literature and Medicine: Volume 1

Author: Clark Lawlor

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108368988

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 581

Download BOOK »
Offering an authoritative and timely account of the relationship between literature and medicine in the eighteenth century and Romantic period, a time when most diseases had no cure, this collection provides a valuable overview of how two dynamic fields influenced and shaped one another. Covering a period in which both medicine and literature underwent frequent and sometimes radical change, the volume examines the complex mutual construction of these two fields via various perspectives: disability, gender, race, rank, sexuality, the global and colonial, politics, ethics, and the visual. Diseases, fashionable and otherwise, such as Defoe's representation of the plague, feature strongly, as authors argue for the role literary genres play in affecting people's experience of physical and mental illness (and health) across the volume. Along with its sister publication, Literature and Medicine in the Nineteenth Century, this volume offers a major critical overview of the study of literature and medicine.

Literature and Medicine

Literature and Medicine

Author: Clark Lawlor

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108420860

Category: History

Page: 293

View: 151

Download BOOK »
Offers an authoritative account of literature and medicine at a vital point in their emergence during the eighteenth century.

Bellies, bowels and entrails in the eighteenth century

Bellies, bowels and entrails in the eighteenth century

Author: Rebecca Anne Barr

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9781526127075

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 174

Download BOOK »
This collection of essays seeks to challenge the notion of the supremacy of the brain as the key organ of the Enlightenment, by focusing on the workings of the bowels and viscera that so obsessed writers and thinkers during the long eighteenth-century. These inner organs and the digestive process acted as counterpoints to politeness and other modes of refined sociability, drawing attention to the deeper workings of the self. Moving beyond recent studies of luxury and conspicuous consumption, where dysfunctional bowels have been represented as a symptom of excess, this book seeks to explore other manifestations of the visceral and to explain how the bowels played a crucial part in eighteenth-century emotions and perceptions of the self. The collection offers an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspective on entrails and digestion by addressing urban history, visual studies, literature, medical history, religious history, and material culture in England, France, and Germany.

Rhinoplasty and the nose in early modern British medicine and culture

Rhinoplasty and the nose in early modern British medicine and culture

Author: Emily Cock

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9781526137180

Category: Medical

Page: 320

View: 997

Download BOOK »
Challenging histories of plastic surgery that posit a complete disappearance of Gaspare Tagliacozzi’s rhinoplasty operation after his death in 1599, Rhinoplasty and the nose in early modern British medicine and culture traces knowledge of the procedure within the early modern British medical community, through to its impact on the nineteenth-century revival of skin-flap facial surgeries. The book explores why such a procedure was controversial, and the cultural importance of the nose, offering critical readings of literary noses from Shakespeare to Laurence Sterne. Medical knowledge of the graft operation was accompanied by a spurious story that the nose would be constructed from flesh purchased from a social inferior, and would drop off when that person died. The volume therefore explores this narrative in detail for its role in the procedure’s stigmatisation, its engagement with the doctrine of medical sympathy, and its unique attempt to commoditise living human flesh.

Itch, Clap, Pox

Itch, Clap, Pox

Author: Noelle Gallagher

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300240764

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 581

Download BOOK »
A lively interdisciplinary study of how venereal disease was represented in eighteenth-century British literature and artIn eighteenth-century Britain, venereal disease was everywhere and nowhere: while physicians and commentators believed the condition to be widespread, it remained shrouded in secrecy, and was often represented using slang, symbolism, and wordplay. In this book, literary critic Noelle Gallagher explores the cultural significance of the “clap” (gonorrhea), the “pox” (syphilis), and the “itch” (genital scabies) for the development of eighteenth-century British literature and art.As a condition both represented through metaphors and used as a metaphor, venereal disease provided a vehicle for the discussion of cultural anxieties about gender, race, commerce, and immigration. Gallagher highlights four key concepts associated with the disease, demonstrating how the infection’s symbolic potency was enhanced by its links to elite masculinity, prostitution, foreignness, and nasal deformity. Casting light where the sun rarely shines, this study will fascinate anyone interested in the history of literature, art, medicine, and sexuality.

Reading Swift's Poetry

Reading Swift's Poetry

Author: Daniel Cook

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108840958

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 325

View: 319

Download BOOK »
This book explicates Jonathan Swift's poetry, reaffirming its prominence in competing literary traditions.

Sex and Death in Eighteenth-Century Literature

Sex and Death in Eighteenth-Century Literature

Author: Jolene Zigarovich

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136182372

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 314

View: 707

Download BOOK »
This book discusses sex and death in the eighteenth-century, an era that among other forms produced the Gothic novel, commencing the prolific examination of the century’s shifting attitudes toward death and uncovering literary moments in which sexuality and death often conjoined. By bringing together various viewpoints and historical relations, the volume contributes to an emerging field of study and provides new perspectives on the ways in which the century approached an increasingly modern sense of sexuality and mortality. It not only provides part of the needed discussion of the relationship between sex, death, history, and eighteenth-century culture, but is a forum in which the ideas of several well-respected critics converge, producing a breadth of knowledge and a diversity of perspectives and methodologies previously unseen. As the contributors demonstrate, eighteenth-century anxieties over mortality, the body, the soul, and the corpse inspired many writers of the time to both implicitly and explicitly embed mortality and sexuality within their works. By depicting the necrophilic tendencies of libertines and rapacious villains, the fetishizing of death and mourning by virtuous heroines, or the fantasy of preserving the body, these authors demonstrate not only the tragic results of sexual play, but the persistent fantasy of necro-erotica. This book shows that within the eighteenth-century culture of profound modern change, underworkings of death and mourning are often eroticized; that sex is often equated with death (as punishment, or loss of the self); and that the sex-death dialectic lies at the discursive center of normative conceptions of gender, desire, and social power.

Boswell and the Press

Boswell and the Press

Author: Donald J. Newman

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9781684482832

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 126

View: 390

Download BOOK »
Boswell and the Press: Essays on the Ephemeral Writing of James Boswell is the first sustained examination of James Boswell’s ephemeral writing, his contributions to periodicals, his pamphlets, and his broadsides. The essays collected here enhance our comprehension of his interests, capabilities, and proclivities as an author and refine our understanding of how the print environment in which he worked influenced what he wrote and how he wrote it. This book will also be of interest to historians of journalism and the publishing industry of eighteenth-century Britain.

Literature & Medicine During the Eighteenth Century

Literature & Medicine During the Eighteenth Century

Author: Marie Mulvey Roberts

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015042088677

Category: English literature

Page: 293

View: 425

Download BOOK »
An exploration of the unity of culture in the Age of the Enlightenment, when 18th-century scientists, writers and artists formed a well-integrated elite.