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The First English Dictionary of Slang 1699

The First English Dictionary of Slang 1699

Author: B. E. Gent

Publisher:

ISBN: 1851243879

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 224

View: 875

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Written originally for the education of the polite London classes in 'canting' - the language of thieves and ruffians - should they be so unlucky as to wander into the 'wrong' parts of town, A New Dictionary of Terms, Ancient and Modern, of the Canting Crew by 'B.E. Gent' is the first work dedicated solely to the subject of slang words and their meanings. It is also the first text which attempts to show the overlap and integration between canting words and common slang. In its refusal to distinguish between criminal vocabulary and the more ordinary everyday English of the period, it sets canting words side by side with terms used by sailors, labourers, and those in the common currency of domestic culture.With an introduction by John Simpson, chief editor of the Oxford English Dictionary, describing the history and culture of canting in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, as well as the evolution of English slang, this is a fascinating volume for anyone with a curiosity about language, or wishing to reintroduce 'Dandyprat' or 'Fizzle' into their everyday conversation.Anglers, c Cheats, petty Thievs, who have a Stick with a hook at the end, with which they pluck things out of Windows, Grates, &c. also those that draw in People to be cheated.Dandyprat, a little puny Fellow.Grumbletonians, Malecontents, out of Humour with the Government, for want of a Place, or having lost one.Strum, c. a Periwig. Rum-Strum, c. a long Wig; also a handsom Wench, or Strumpet.

The First English Dictionary of Slang 1699

The First English Dictionary of Slang 1699

Author: B. E.

Publisher:

ISBN: 1851243488

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 195

View: 245

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Written originally for the education of the polite London classes in ‘canting’ – the language of thieves and ruffians – should they be so unlucky as to wander into the ‘wrong’ parts of town, A New Dictionary of Terms, Ancient and Modern, of the Canting Crew by ‘B.E. Gent’ is the first work dedicated solely to the subject of slang words and their meanings. It is also the first text which attempts to show the overlap and integration between canting words and common slang. In its refusal to distinguish between criminal vocabulary and the more ordinary everyday English of the period, it sets canting words side by side with terms used by sailors, labourers, and those in the common currency of domestic culture.With an introduction by John Simpson, chief editor of the Oxford English Dictionary, describing the history and culture of canting in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, as well as the evolution of English slang, this is a fascinating volume for anyone with a curiosity about language, or wishing to reintroduce ‘Dandyprat’ or ‘Fizzle’ into their everyday conversation.Anglers, c Cheats, petty Thievs, who have a Stick with a hook at the end, with which they pluck things out of Windows, Grates, &c. also those that draw in People to be cheated.Dandyprat, a little puny Fellow.Grumbletonians, Malecontents, out of Humour with the Government, for want of a Place, or having lost one.Strum, c. a Periwig. Rum-Strum, c. a long Wig; also a handsom Wench, or Strumpet.

Disease and Death in Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture

Disease and Death in Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture

Author: Allan Ingram

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137597182

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 290

View: 814

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This collection examines different aspects of attitudes towards disease and death in writing of the long eighteenth century. Taking three conditions as examples – ennui, sexual diseases and infectious diseases – as well as death itself, contributors explore the ways in which writing of the period placed them within a borderland between fashionability and unfashionability, relating them to current social fashions and trends. These essays also look at ways in which diseases were fashioned into bearing cultural, moral, religious and even political meaning. Works of literature are used as evidence, but also medical writings, personal correspondence and diaries. Diseases or conditions subject to scrutiny include syphilis, male impotence, plague, smallpox and consumption. Death, finally, is looked at both in terms of writers constructing meanings within death and of the fashioning of posthumous reputation.

The Place of Stone

The Place of Stone

Author: Douglas Hunter

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9781469634418

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 873

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Claimed by many to be the most frequently documented artifact in American archeology, Dighton Rock is a forty-ton boulder covered in petroglyphs in southern Massachusetts. First noted by New England colonists in 1680, the rock's markings have been debated endlessly by scholars and everyday people alike on both sides of the Atlantic. The glyphs have been erroneously assigned to an array of non-Indigenous cultures: Norsemen, Egyptians, Lost Tribes of Israel, vanished Portuguese explorers, and even a prince from Atlantis. In this fascinating story rich in personalities and memorable characters, Douglas Hunter uses Dighton Rock to reveal the long, complex history of colonization, American archaeology, and the conceptualization of Indigenous people. Hunter argues that misinterpretations of the rock's markings share common motivations and have erased Indigenous people not only from their own history but from the landscape. He shows how Dighton Rock for centuries drove ideas about the original peopling of the Americas, including Bering Strait migration scenarios and the identity of the "Mound Builders." He argues the debates over Dighton Rock have served to answer two questions: Who belongs in America, and to whom does America belong?

Literary Names

Literary Names

Author: Alastair Fowler

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199592227

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 283

View: 693

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Names hidden by acrostic or anagram, pseudonyms, pen-names, nicknames, nameless characters, and lists of names are all explored in this erudite and fascinating book, which encompasses literature from ancient times to modern.

Fowler's Dictionary of Modern English Usage

Fowler's Dictionary of Modern English Usage

Author: Henry Watson Fowler

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780199661350

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 928

View: 495

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Why literally shouldn't be taken literally. Why Americans think home in on something is a mistake and Brits think hone in is. Is it OK to spell OK okay? What's wrong with hence why? Was Alanis Morrisette ever ironic? Fowler's Dictionary of Modern English Usage is the world-famous guide to English usage, loved and used by writers, editors, and anyone who values correct English since it first appeared in 1926. Fowler's gives comprehensive and practical advice on complex points of grammar, syntax, punctuation, style, and word choice. Now enlarged and completely revised to reflect English usage in the 21st century, it provides a crystal-clear, authoritative picture of the English we use, while illuminating scores of usage questions old and new. International in scope, it gives in-depth coverage of both British and American English usage issues, with reference also to the English of Australia, Canada, India, New Zealand, and South Africa. The thousands of authentic examples in the book vividly demonstrate how modern writers tackls debated usage issues. They come on the one hand from established literary figures such as Chinua Achebe, Peter Ackroyd, Raymond Carver, Iris Murdoch, Harold Pinter, and Vikram Seth. On the other, they are drawn from a vast range of newspapers, journals, books, broadcast material, websites, and other digital sources from across the globe, and include references to topical personalities such as Stephen Fry, Prince Harry, Jeremy Paxman, and Wayne Rooney. Based on the evidence and research of the Oxford Dictionaries Programme, this is the most comprehensive and authoritative guide to usage available.

The Cambridge Companion to English Dictionaries

The Cambridge Companion to English Dictionaries

Author: Sarah Ogilvie

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108568456

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 377

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How did a single genre of text have the power to standardise the English language across time and region, rival the Bible in notions of authority, and challenge our understanding of objectivity, prescription, and description? Since the first monolingual dictionary appeared in 1604, the genre has sparked evolution, innovation, devotion, plagiarism, and controversy. This comprehensive volume presents an overview of essential issues pertaining to dictionary style and content and a fresh narrative of the development of English dictionaries throughout the centuries. Essays on the regional and global nature of English lexicography (dictionary making) explore its power in standardising varieties of English and defining nations seeking independence from the British Empire: from Canada to the Caribbean. Leading scholars and lexicographers historically contextualise an array of dictionaries and pose urgent theoretical and methodological questions relating to their role as tools of standardisation, prestige, power, education, literacy, and national identity.

Nightwalking

Nightwalking

Author: Matthew Beaumont

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN: 9781781687970

Category: Social Science

Page: 496

View: 641

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A captivating literary portrait of the writers who explore the city at night, and the people they met. “Cities, like cats, will reveal themselves at night,” wrote the poet Rupert Brooke. Before the age of electricity, the nighttime city was a very different place to the one we know today – home to the lost, the vagrant and the noctambulant. Matthew Beaumont recounts an alternative history of London by focusing on those of its denizens who surface on the streets when the sun’s down. If nightwalking is a matter of “going astray” in the streets of the metropolis after dark, then nightwalkers represent some of the most suggestive and revealing guides to the neglected and forgotten aspects of the city. In this brilliant work of literary investigation, Beaumont shines a light on the shadowy perambulations of poets, novelists and thinkers: Chaucer and Shakespeare; William Blake and his ecstatic peregrinations and the feverish ramblings of opium addict Thomas De Quincey; and, among the lamp-lit literary throng, the supreme nightwalker Charles Dickens. We discover how the nocturnal city has inspired some and served as a balm or narcotic to others. In each case, the city is revealed as a place divided between work and pleasure, the affluent and the indigent, where the entitled and the desperate jostle in the streets. With a foreword and afterword by Will Self, Nightwalking is a captivating literary portrait of the writers who explore the city at night and the people they meet.

Words in Time and Place

Words in Time and Place

Author: David Crystal

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780199680474

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 288

View: 264

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How has the English language developed over time? How have words entered the English language, or changed their meaning? David Crystal takes us on a wonderful tour through the origins and evolution of 15 groups of words, from dying to spacecraft. His source is the monumental Historical Thesaurus of the Oxford English Dictionary.

Slang

Slang

Author: Michael Adams

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198042945

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 99

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Slang, writes Michael Adams, is poetry on the down low, and sometimes lowdown poetry on the down low, but rarely, if ever, merely lowdown. It is the poetry of everyday speech, the people's poetry, and it deserves attention as language playing on the cusp of art. In Slang: The People's Poetry, Adams covers this perennially interesting subject in a serious but highly engaging way, illuminating the fundamental question "What is Slang" and defending slang--and all forms of nonstandard English--as integral parts of the American language. Why is an expression like "bed head" lost in a lexical limbo, found neither in slang nor standard dictionaries? Why are snow-boarding terms such as "fakie," "goofy foot," "ollie" and "nollie" not considered slang? As he addresses these and other lexical curiosities, Adams reveals that slang is used in part to define groups, distinguishing those who are "down with it" from those who are "out of it." Slang is also a rebellion against the mainstream. It often irritates those who color within the lines--indeed, slang is meant to irritate, sometimes even to shock. But slang is also inventive language, both fun to make and fun to use. Rather than complain about slang as "bad" language, Adams urges us to celebrate slang's playful resistance to the commonplace and to see it as the expression of an innate human capacity, not only for language, but for poetry.

A Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English

A Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English

Author: Eric Partridge

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134963652

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 1432

View: 924

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The definitive work on the subject, this Dictionary - available again in its eighth edition - gives a full account of slang and unconventional English over four centuries and will entertain and inform all language-lovers.