Thunderhead: Book Review


Thunderhead is an electric sequel to Scythe and will go down in memory as a book with one of the most intense endings I’ve ever read.
5 Stars


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ARC Review: The Kingdom of Copper

A copy of this book was provided to me by the publisher per my request. All thoughts and opinions expressed in this review are completely my own. Any quotes included in this review come from an advance reader copy
and are subject to change in the final release.

The Kingdom of Copper
Author: S.A. Chakraborty
Release Date: January 22, 2019
Publisher: Harper Voyager
Rating: 5 Stars (I’d give it more if it was possible)
Synopsis and Pre-Order links can be found at the
Publisher’s webiste: [here]

Chakraborty has done it again! I’m not gonna lie, I’ve tried for the last two days to think of something more eloquent to write besides “I LOVE THIS BOOK SO MUCH!” But, the fact of the matter is I LOVE THIS BOOK SO MUCH!

If you’ve read The City of Brass (and if you haven’t, GO READ IT RIGHT NOW! And then check out my review of it here) you know that Chakraborty excels in rich world building and creating characters that you love (even if you should hate them). The Kingdom of Copper takes everything that happens in The City of Brass, plus Chakraborty’s growing talent, and ratchets up the tension and mystery and action so much that I could barely put the book down.

One of the great things about Chakraborty’s writing is the realness she brings to her characters. They are all strong, weak, flawed, and perfect in their own ways. Just like real people. There were characters whose deaths I was wishing for at the beginning of the book, but by the end I was screaming when I thought they had been cut down. The abject cruelty of Ghassan is a frightening thing to read, especially in our current political situation. Nahri is so much stronger in this book and to see her growth is a wonderful thing to behold. By far, the best quote in the book is from Nahri: “I’ve had enough of men hurting me because they were upset.” If that isn’t a mood for 2019, I don’t know what is.

There truly is not a single thing I would change about this book. From a purely entertainment side of things, this book gives us adventure, drama, intrigue, and lushly described settings. But there is so much more to take from this story. The violent tensions between the shafit and djinn reflect many things happening in our society these days. Reading the ways in which Daevabad tears itself apart over prejudices is disheartening but it makes you think about our world. I want people to read this book to see the world through different eyes. We don’t have enough books like this and that needs to change.

I basically said this in my review for The City of Brass, but it rings even more true now that I’ve finished The Kingdom of Copper: When people ask me for fantasy book recommendations, The Daevabad Trilogy is what I’ll be telling them to read for years to come.